Air Cleaner Drip 11/84, P24

Here's a solution for nasty air cleaner oil dribbles: The situation is easily remedied by adding a one-inch long piece of tubing to a plastic spout which is used to field liquids into the bottom of a plastic bottle (one inch high) which is lined with open cell foam. Merely squeeze out the foam every 5-7000 miles de­pending upon the type of usage and tempera­ture.

Bill Connors, #0087

Air Filter

I'm finding a lot of air filters that have never been replaced. These are paper filters and I feel they should be replaced about every 20,000 miles. I've seen filters that look okay, but the paper on the filter had gotten wet due to rain. This will reduce its efficiency . Please check it.

Carburetor Maintenance

Ed Note: The following article is in response to several calls we have received inquiring about problems with the Venture's carburetor.

I have used this procedure for over 15 years on all types of carburetors, from lawn mowers to high performance cars and as long as the carburetor was in good mechanical order, have always had good results. Cleaning will not help a carburetor with a worn nozzle or a leaky diaphragm on the slide. The carburetor cleaner I use is Berryman B-12 Chem tool in the pint-size spray can, but any good carburetor cleaner should work if you can get it in a pint-size spray can.

To clean the carburetors, place the bike on the center stand and remove the air cleaner cover and the filter, exposing the top of the carburetors. Start the engine and open the throttle to make sure the slides are moving. If one or more of the slides fails to move, you may have a broken diaphragm or a clogged jet. Use the spray can to clean the insides of the carburetors, spraying into the jets at the top and the throat of the carburetors. If the engine stalls, restart and continue until it looks clean. Replace the filter and cover, now turn the gas tank valve to the off position and restart the engine and run it until it stops. Remove the supply hose (top hose) from the fuel pump and replace it with a suitable sized hose long enough to reach the ground and put it into the pint can of cleaner. Now turn the key on and allow the fuel pump to fill the carburetors before starting. (Note: the fuel pump has a safety feature and you may have to turn the key off and on until the pump fills the carburetors.)

Start the engine using the choke to keep the engine running about 1000 RPMs and allow it to run for about 5 minutes. Wait about 20 minutes, restart the engine and use the throttle to increase the RPM and work all the moving parts of the carburetors, then run for 4 minutes and wait for another 20 minutes.

If you used the spray on the outside of the carburetors, be sure to re-oil the moving parts with a light machine oil. If all of the slides worked when you tested them, you can reconnect the fuel line while you're waiting. When the alotted time has passed, you can turn the gas valve to the on or reserve position and open the drain valves on the carburetors (lower right on each carburetor). When the carburetors are empty, close the valves and turn the key on to fill the carburetors with fuel. Also, if you are storing the bike for the winter you could drain the carburetors and not restart the engine.

If one or more of the slides did not move when you tested them, you should re-test them now by removing the air cleaner cover and filter and watching the slides. If it is still not moving, note the problem slide and turn off the engine. Remove the cover plate and inspect the diaphragm, then carefully remove the spring and slide from the carburetor. You will see a jet in the upper right side of the opening. Place the nozzle of the spray can against this jet, cover the opening with your hand so that the excess spray won't get in your eyes and give it a good shot; cleaner should come out of the top of the carburetor. If it seems clear, wipe off the slide and the hole it came out of and reassemble the slide making sure that you replace the diaphragm exactly as you found it.

Fred Vogt #01037 Las Vegas ,NV

Carburetor Maintenance

I am writing this article in response to several calls I have received through the VTS office concerning problems with carburetors on the Venture. I have used the following procedure for over 15 years on all types of carburetors, from lawn mowers to high performance cars, and as long as the carburetor was in good mechanical order, have had good results. Cleaning the carburetors will not help a carburetor with a worn nozzle or leaky diaphragm on the slide. The carburetor cleaner I use is Berryman B-12 Chemtool in the pint-size spray can. Any good carburetor cleaner should work if you can get it in a pint-size spray can.

To clean the carburetors, place the bike on the center stand and remove the cover of the air cleaner and the filter, exposing the top of the carburetors. Next, start the engine and open the throttle to make sure the slides are all moving.

13f one or more of the slides fails to move, you may have a broken diaphragm or a clogged jet. Use the spray can to clean the insides of the car-buretors, spraying into the jets at the top and the throat of the carburetors. If the engine stalls, restart and continue until it looks clean. Replace the filter and cover. Turn the gas tank valve to the off position and restart the engine, and run it until it stops. Remove the supply hose (top hose) from the fuel pump and replace it with a suitable sized hose, long enough to reach the ground, and put it into the pint can of cleaner. Now, turn the key on and allow the fuel pump to fill the carburetors before starting. (Note: the fuel pump has a safety feature and you may have to turn the key off and on until the pump fills the carburetors.)

Start the engine, using the choke to keep the engine running about 1000 RPM's, and allow it to run for about 5 minutes. Then go get a cup of coffee or clean the outside of the carburetors to use up the can of spray, waiting about 20 minutes. Restart the engine and use the throttle to increase the RPM's and work all the moving parts of the carburetors. Run for 4 minutes, and wait for another 20 minutes.

If you used the spray on the outside of the carburetors, be sure to re-oil the moving parts with a light machine oil, and if all of the slides work when you tested them, you can reconnect the fuel line while you're waiting. When the time has passed, you can turn the gas valve to the on or reserve position and open the drain valves on the carburetors (lower right on each carburetor). When the carburetors are empty, close the valves and turn the key on to fill the carburetors with fuel. Also, if you are storing the bike for the winter, you could drain the carburetors and not restart the engine.

If one or more of the slides did not move when you tested them, you should re-test them now. By removing the air cleaner cover and ter, and watching the slides, if any are still not moving, note the problem slide and turn off the engine. Remove the cover plate and inspect the diaphragm, then carefully remove the spring and slide from the carburetor. You will see a jet in the upper right side of the opening. Place the nozzle of the spray can against this jet, cover the opening with your hand so that the excess spray won't get in your eyes, and give it a good shot. The cleaner should come out of the top of the carburetor. If it seems clear, wipe off the slide and the hole it came out of and reassemble the slide, making sure that you replace the diaphragm exactly as you found it!

Fred Vogt #01037 Las Vegas, NV

 

Clutch Fluid — 3/90, P16 & 18

Look at the reservoir on the left handlebar. Is the slight window noticeable darker than the reservoir on the right handlebar (brakes)? Does your clutch seem sluggish or mushy? If the answer to any of these ques­tions is yes, it's time to change the fluid for the hydraulic clutch on your Venture.

Some of you may wonder why the clutch fluid gets dark and looks burnt when it's DOT3 brake fluid, while the brake reservoir never looks dark or burnt. Because the slave cylinder for the clutch is mounted in the en­gine case itself, it takes much more heat than the brakes do and actually starts the deterio­ration process much more quickly. The fluid gets hotter much faster and starts to thicken up more speedily than if it were subject to usage in the brake system.

With the brakes out in the open on a bike, the fluid gets a chance to cool between uses, where the clutch system is constantly hot as long as the engine is running. Abuse on the clutch system is multiplied several times when pulling a trailer or sidecar, as many of us do.

That is why it's smart to change the clutch fluid when the color has turned very dark. You get a chance to flush some of the garbage out of the system and prolong the life of your clutch. I, personally, change the fluid in our bikes at the beginning of every riding season so it doesn't get that band and build up varnish and sludge in the hydraulic system.

The first thing to do is center-stand the bike and remove the left side panel and the plastic cover below it. Then cover the bike to protect paint, making sure that every area than can be splashed with brake fluid is cov­ered. DOT3 brake fluid makes an excellent paint remover and also distorts and discol­ors most plastics, so cover as much as possi­ble with a piece of plastic or vinyl. Brake fluid will soak through rags so stay away from them.

Now find the rubber cap located on the left side of the engine case, rearward and to the left of the rear cylinder. Remove this cap and you will see a bleeder screw. This is the screw to bleed the clutch slave cylinder, the area where the fluid takes the most heat and builds up more varnish and gum, which causes the dark color.

Next, slip an 8mm wrench over the bleeder screw, allowing room to move the screw in either direction. On the top of the bleeder screw, attach a piece of vacuum hose and route it into a container. The hose must fit snugly over the bleeder screw so no fluid escapes. I would suggest using a clear container or bottle and use a clear piece of hose so that you can see when the fluid is clear and not the old, dark fluid (see Picture. (See article).

 Now you're ready to flush the system. Pump the clutch lever once or twice and hold it in. While holding it in, open the bleeder screw and leave it open until you feel no more resistance, or until the fluid stops coming out of the bleeder screw. While still holding the clutch lever in, close the bleeder screw. If you release the clutch lever while the bleeder screw is open, you will pull air into the hydraulic system, which you don't want to do! Repeat the above pro­cedure until the fluid leaving the bleeder screw is clear, frequently checking the mas­ter cylinder on the left handlebar to make sure it isn't empty. You will have to fill this a couple of times during the process of flushing the system. If your fluid was real dirty, you will have to do this more than someone whose fluid was reasonably clean.
 
After you're done and the fluid coming out is as clean as the fluid you're adding, re­install the side panels and make sure the fluid in the clutch master cylinder is between the marks on the sight glass. After a short drive around the block you'll notice the difference in the way your clutch works. You also might be preventing a clutch failure on the road.

Bill Daly